Access to Academic Goods

Monday, June 15, 2015
Let's face it, the moment a student returns from an extended absence, getting them back on track is a hot mess of a process.

I'm a firm believer in making sure that students always have access to all the academic goods. By academic goods, I mean the teacher edition of any foldables and interactive notebooks.

In the beginning of the year, I realized that some of my co-teachers weren't keeping copies of what they were doing in class. Thus, when students were missing work or when we decided to perform notebook/binder checks they were unable to determine what to give/ what students were suppose to get.

Table of Contents for Social Studies Notebook
Social Studies Foldable Notebook













Social Studies Foldable Notebook with completed notes.














So I began keeping a copy of the notebooks for the students to reference. When students needed the notebook, they knew to either make an appointment after school if they were missing things or request to borrow it.

Math Portfolio with interactive notes/ foldables


Math Portfolio with completed notes.

This system has been super beneficial for students who have difficulties with executive functioning. After an absence, they know that there is a "teacher version" for them to reference. In addition, students who have it listed as an IEP accommodation, are able to use mine when they are testing in a separate setting. I usually bring my copy to class, and students who forget theirs would request to use mine as an additional reference.

Also, I've found that having my own copy, rather than having the general education teacher have it, has made all students (with or without IEPs) so comfortable with coming to me and asking me for supports. It breaks the ice! Since my office is not in the classroom/ I don't share my room with my co-teacher, I wanted to make sure that anyone can come in and ask for help. There's no discrimination - Ms. N is here for everyone. Keeping my own copy really assisted with that!


Warning: if you're against having swarms of students staying after school, this isn't for you.


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